PASHMINA MOUNTAINS PUBLISHED IN GERMAN!

I’m delighted to tell you that IN THE FAR PASHMINA MOUNTAINS will be published tomorrow in German as:

DAS WAGNIS IN DER FERNE

Here is the gorgeous cover!

Longlisted for the Romantic Historical Novel of the Year in 2019, this novel was also an Amazon First Reads.

From shipwreck and heartbreak to treachery and war: can their love survive?

DAS WAGNIS IN DER FERNE

To find out more about the English language version, click here: IN THE FAR PASHMINA MOUNTAINS

DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER – but this special is nearly over!

LAST CHANCE to pick up THE DIAMOND DAUGHTER at the bargain price of 99p!

OFFER ENDS on 31st JANUARY

THE DIAMOND DAUGHTER

Super excited to share with you – THE DIAMOND DAUGHTER now out in paperback!

1946: lively Jeanie Munro is returning to a post-war India, a country on the cusp of momentous change – and to a husband she hasn’t seen for over six years. While she tries to recapture their former loving relationship, Jeanie’s world is rocked by the discovery of long-buried family secrets and betrayal that threatens to destroy her future.

THE DIAMOND DAUGHTER

Third and final novel in THE RAJ HOTEL SERIES

Introducing … THE DIAMOND DAUGHTER!

I’m thrilled to be able to show you the cover for my forthcoming novel, THE DIAMOND DAUGHTER – the third and final book in THE RAJ HOTEL SERIES.

In this emotional story set in 1946 post-war India, can a woman’s quest for love survive shocking secrets and betrayal?

It will be published on 8th November.

And just to let you know that the ebook is available for pre-order on Amazon:

Amazon UK

Amazon.com

Amazon.Australia

I’ll be in touch with more details soon.

Have a great weekend!

Janet

Launching THE SAPPHIRE CHILD with the senses of INDIA!

My Five Senses of India: A Guest Post by Janet MacLeod Trotter, Author of The Sapphire Child

On publication day, I wanted to share this post that celebrates the senses of India and has allowed me the chance to revisit the India of my memories at a time when travel isn’t possible. I hope you enjoy it!

The Sapphire Child – on sale now

India is my cup of tea!

Part Two of my interview with Montenegrin writer, Vujica Ognjenović

7. In the first book of your The India Tea Series, entitled “The Tea Planter’s Daughter,” you talk about the bitter fate of the daughter of the owner of a tea plantation on the Indian hills of Assam are full of promise. I guess you had a strong reason to write such a touching story?

I have a fascination for tea and its history – and I drink a lot of it! What I discovered while researching was the strong links between Britain and the Indian tea plantations and the huge popularity of tea drinking at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was a massive industry that stretched from these remote fertile valleys in Assam and the hills of Darjeeling to the auction houses in Calcutta and London, and then sold around the streets of Britain and drunk in vast quantities by rich and poor.

I wanted to write a novel which showed all aspects of this trade and so created a strong heroine, Clarissa Belhaven, who is torn from a comfortable life in India because of the death and bankruptcy of her tea planter father and has to come to Britain. Here she is shocked by the poverty of her father’s homeland and determines to lift herself and her sister out of the dire conditions that they find themselves in.

8. How much can such bitter life experiences, such as the experience of Clarissa Belhaven, strengthen, man? It is said among the people: “Not every evil is from evil.” What do you think about that?

That is the strength of my character Clarissa: she refuses to allow the poverty and degradation she finds in early 20th century north of England to bring her down or leave her embittered. She and her sister, Olive, are virtual slaves when they come to working-class Newcastle but she battles on behalf of them both to lift them out of poverty. She refuses to sink to the level of her cruel and alcoholic aunt, and when her own circumstances improve, Clarrie does her best to help others. She breaks the chain of abuse and is a comfort and support to other women living in terrible conditions. She is a deeply caring person but it is true that what she suffers and experiences makes her a stronger person too.

9. The second book in this series, “The Tea Planter’s Bride,” is about India-born Sophie, who is left an orphan at the age of six. After that, her relatives take her to Scotland, but as an adult girl, Sophie returns to India. However, day by day, Sophie becomes more and more dissatisfied, unhappy. Why?

My grandmother who married a forester in India, 1920s

Sophie is a loving character but she has suffered great loss and trauma as a small girl – the death of her parents and the disappearance of her baby brother – and so returning to India amplifies these loses again. But it makes her also determined to find out what really happened on the tragic day when her parents died. Without giving too much away about the plot, Sophie is looking for love and a deep relationship that has been lacking in her life. She thinks she has found love with a Scottish forester in India but he is hiding secrets of his own and the more she gets to know him, the more unhappy she becomes. The one man she is drawn towards is an Indian forester, Rafi; across the racial divide. She puts duty before love and struggles to find peace of mind.

10. While creating the character of Sophie, did you keep in mind that “nothing can make an unhappy person happy”? Or: what can make a man happy, if that man feels unhappy at the bottom of his soul from his early youth?

You touch on an important point, that Sophie’s struggle to find happiness is rooted in the trauma of her earliest childhood. She only begins to discover quite how terrible were the events that lead to her being sent to Scotland at the age of six, when she returns to India and with the help of her close cousin, Tilly, begins to delve into her past. In a way, India reawakens her and long-buried memories begin to resurface once she is back there. But Sophie is not a melancholic character. She is sociable and tries to make the most of her new life in India, even though her marriage is increasingly unhappy. She has an inner strength to carry on and finds contentment in friendships and the outdoor life of a forester’s wife.

11. Your series “The India Tea Series” contains a lot of books. The plots of these books are located for the most part in India, at a time when India was an English colony. Why?

This period of British-Indian history fascinates me because of my various family connections with India at this time. Having survived the First World War as a soldier, my grandfather trained as a forester and went out to India to work. He had a whirlwind romance with my grandmother before he left Scotland and she followed him out to India a year later to marry him. They were married in Lahore, a wonderful old city in the Punjab (now in Pakistan) and she embarked on the itinerant life of a forester’s wife. She went into the mountains with him on camping expeditions and lived in remote places in the forest.

Long after they died, I discovered my grandfather’s diaries, my grandmother’s letters home to her parents in Scotland and very old cine films they had made in the 1920s and 1930s. They gave a vivid picture of their life in British India and I have used some of it as background material for the novels – in particular, ‘The Tea Planter’s Bride’ – a lot of which is set in the Punjab.

My grandparents and mother trekking in the Himalayas circa 1930

My grandparents experienced all the momentous changes that took place in India from the 1920s, through the Second World War and then Indian Independence. The novels also portray these times. I’m delighted to say that the third novel, ‘The Girl from the Tea Garden,’ which is set in the 1930s and 40s, is to be published in Serbian by Laguna in the near future.

12. In the book “Emerald Affair” you talk in a very interesting way about two friends who left Scotland after the First World War and went to tropical India. In India, their friendship is repeatedly put to a serious test. Is the motif of this book based on real events?

The two friends are completely fictional, but again I have used background material from my grandfather’s diaries in India for the novel. It is partly set in a city called Rawalpindi where my grandfather worked which is not far from the lawless tribal areas of the North West Frontier. I don’t want to give too much away about the plot but in the novel the friends are caught up in a kidnapping in this area. The incident is partially based on real events that happened on the Frontier in the 1920s.

I have just finished writing a sequel to this novel called, ‘The Sapphire Child’ which follows the same group of friends into the next generation and through the Second World War.

13. In your books you often talk about friendship, friendship… Is it true that a friendship between two people only lasts until a more serious conflict of their interests? What do you think friendship is? How much can a man believe in friendship?

Friendship is hugely important in my novels – and in life! I think real friendship does not break-up when there are differences of opinion or when there is a conflict of interests; that is when true friendship is tested. In ‘The Tea Planter’s Daughter,’ Clarissa finds friendship in unexpected places when she is forced to leave India. Still grieving the loss of her father and at the mercy of a cruel aunt, she finds comradeship among the working-class women she serves in her uncle’s bar. These friendships turn out to be of great importance and she is able to repay their kindness and companionship by later helping them. In this way, I think friendship is linked to loyalty and the desire to support friends when they need it.

There’s an expression, ‘you can’t pick your relations but you can pick your friends.’ In my experience, my relations are some of my best friends! Friendship is about enjoying people’s company, helping them without expecting anything in return, and forgiving or being able to say sorry. In ‘The Emerald Affair’, there are very strong friendships between the women (Esmie and Lydia) and the men (Tom and Harold). The novel explores how these friendships are tested to the utmost when they start new lives in India. How big is Esmie’s capacity to forgive when Lydia betrays that friendship and where do the loyalties of all four friends lie?

TEA FOR THREE … and a HAPPY NEW YEAR!

THE THREE INDIA TEA NOVELS are keeping each other company in the Amazon bestseller charts, as we go into the New Year ….

screenshot-2016-12-30-17-40-52

The India Tea Series – UK

The India Tea Series – Amazon.com

A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL!

 

Tea, tigers and tennis! The true story that inspired THE PLANTER’S BRIDE novel

Invitation to the paperback launch of my new novel THE PLANTER’S BRIDE

9781908359360
If anyone is in Morpeth, Northumberland on SATURDAY 7th JUNE then come along to The Chantry Museum at 3pm for a trip back in time to 1920’s India!

 

Unique cine footage that my forester grandfather filmed in the foothills of the Himalayas and never before shown in public will provide the backdrop to readings from the novel. Take a look at the taster clip showing my mum and uncle being transported in a basket on top of a mule along narrow mountain tracks!

 

 

Tales of tigers, tennis and tea parties …. I’ll be talking about the real life experience of my grandparents in India who trekked into remote parts of the Himalayas – and how this inspired the latest novel in my India Tea Series.

 

The event is free but to book a place please email: morpeth.tic@northumberland.gov.uk

or telephone: 01670 623455

http://bit.ly/1gxfs1Q

 

 

HERE COMES THE BRIDE! – *New Novel out now*

THE PLANTER’S BRIDE – sequel to THE TEA PLANTER’S DAUGHTER – is now available as an ebook.

9781908359360

The story is partly inspired by my maternal grandparents, having discovered diaries and letters written by them, giving rich detail of their lives in India in the 1920s and 30s. Granddad Bob worked for the India Forest Service and my intrepid Granny Sydney followed him out from Scotland to marry and live the itinerant life of a forester’s wife.

My granny in her wedding dress in a garden in Lahore is featured on the cover!

They trekked through remote parts of the Himalayan foothills – and when they became parents, the kids went too! My mum Sheila, as a baby, was hoist in a pram on poles and carried through the jungles and along mountainous pathways along with the tents and supplies! Mum being carried through foothills of Himalayas

 

 

The new novel follows the fortunes of two cousins, Sophie and Tilly, who leave post 1st World War Britain behind and head for adventure in India – Sophie determined to find out the truth behind her parents sudden death in the tea planting area of Assam 15 years previously …

 

Available now on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk and other Amazon sites, as well as Kobo, Nook, Apple and other tablets and ereaders.

Retro look at the world – photos from India: 1920s Himalayas to 1970s overland travel!

In 1923 my granny left Edinburgh and went out to India to marry my grandfather in Lahore (now in Pakistan). They spent the 20s and 30s living and working in the Punjab and foothills of the Himalayas – Bob Gorrie was a forester.

Over 50 years later, I followed in their footsteps by going out east on an overland bus …

Retronaut – 1970’s Overlanders

Anyone interested in the pictorial history of these times, should take a look at an interesting site called Retronaut, which provides time-capsules of ordinary people’s experiences through old photos and film.

My two capsules are on there, and there are dozens more – a treasure trove for the writer or researcher!

Retronaut – 1920’s India